Add to Wish List

Click the button below to add the VINTAGE Caron Tabac Blond Extrait (Pure Parfum) to your wish list.

VINTAGE Caron Tabac Blond Extrait (Pure Parfum)

Price:
$14.99
Brand:
Availability:
allow 1-2 business days for shipping, this is not when the product will arrive
Gift Wrapping:
Options available
Quantity:


Perfume Description

Parfums Caron was established by Ernest Daltroff in 1904. He purchased the perfumery from Anne-Marie Caron and kept the original name. At the same time, he met Félicie Wanpouille, who became his partner and an important contributor to the success of the house. While Daltroff created the fragrances, she designed bottles and served as the artistic director.

Daltroff created Tabac Blond in 1919 as a fragrance for women who smoked cigarettes. Many French women picked up American women's acceptance of smoking in public after World War I. It is a dry fragrance with a unique combination of leather, tobacco leaves and vanilla that has an intense note of smoke that is beloved by both men and women. 

The Caron website describes Tabac Blond as a great emotional perfume - coppery overtones combined with a floral heart note and just a touch of masculine nonchalance. It features top notes of leather, carnation and linden (lime blossom); middle notes of iris, ylang-ylang, vetiver and lime tree leaf; and base notes of cedar, patchouli, vanilla, amber and musk.

From Now Smell This
 
A lot has been made of Luca Turin's statement, as quoted by Chandler Burr in The Emperor of Scent, that Caron Tabac Blond is "dykey and angular and dark and totally unpresentable", and that a man who takes a woman wearing Tabac Blond to meet his mother is set for trouble. For sure, if the mother is looking for a gently floral daughter-in-law with a cashmere sweater set and a subscription to Good Housekeeping, she will be disappointed. But Turin's larger discussion is often overlooked, that Tabac Blond embodies the wit and intelligence of chic. Turin ends his rant about the sorry state of chic these days by saying that a savvy mother will admire the style of her son's Tabac Blond-wearing lover.
 
The first time I smelled Tabac Blond was on a cotton ball, and it seemed harsh and almost diesel-like to me. Once I had it on my skin, though, I knew I’d always have a bottle on hand. Although I can imagine a man wearing Tabac Blond well, on me the perfume feels luxuriously womanly.

Tabac Blond's range isn’t huge. I don't get the piquant top notes that many fragrances provide, but instead tobacco leaf, gently supported by spicy florals, starts right off the bat. Then the scent of raw leather appears for a while, and the effect is that of a buttery leather ashtray full of cigarette butts and snickerdoodles, or maybe a leather-vanilla soufflé in a smoky brasserie, if anything like that were ever cooked up. Imagine lipstick-stained wine glasses on marble-topped tables, a smeared golden haze on the mirror over the bar, and worn, red leather banquettes, and you start to get the idea. Tabac Blond has good staying power, and a dab on each wrist and behind the ears will last all day.

Lauren Stover's The Bombshell Manual of Style says "if you must travel light and Tabac Blond suits you, this is the perfume to grab", and I couldn’t agree more. 

From Fragrantica - Guest

This review is for the vintage parfum extrait. One drop on one wrist is all it takes for me to get wafts of this for the whole day and on into evening. Tabac Blond really is very edgy. When I sniff my wrist or even just smell the outside of my vintage bottle, in my minds eye I see the drag racing scene in 'Rebel Without a Cause.' Loose tobacco, smoke, and burning rubber: all of these smells comprise Tabac Blond. Many people say they cannot smell any tobacco in Tabac Blond and it's true that TB does not smell like cigarettes, or cigars, or pipe tobacco....but I think it does resemble the smell of loose chewing tobacco. And after many hours, when only the dregs are left, the Tabac Blond base-notes of amber and a hint of vanilla are laid bare. I can smell no leather per se in this, but I do smell what I imagine a leather clad, bad-ass biker might smell like after a long night of brawling and womanizing at the biker bar.

From Fragrantica - rebella

I have the tiniest little sample of Caron Tabac Blond extrait. I was a little worried at first that I wouldn't like it since I don't like all vintage fragrances. But I didn't have to worry. Tabac Blond is, on me, an archetypical kind of perfume. It smells like perfume's history, presence and future at the same time. It is elegant, ageless and timeless. 

The carnation note is close to being a carnation soliflore but somehow it manages not to be. It is rich, golden, strong and very pleasant without being too much. The leather note is quite discrete on me, just as I like leather in perfume. In Tabac Blond the leather note is pure with refined luxury yet still has some rough edges.

Caron's Tabac Blond deserve its place among perfume legends. It's long-lasting, rich and makes me feel like a golden-age Hollywood movie star. Tabac Blond could easily be worn by both men and women and I think it would suit any age, apart from maybe the youngest. I'll always need a little amount of Tabac Blond in my collection, it is like a golden shining star. Masterpiece class, best of the best, a must must must try!

From Bois de Jasmin

Ernest Daltroff must have been quite a character and also a man of great marketing vision. When smoking became appropriate for women after WWI, in 1919, he promptly created Tabac Blond. It was a fragrance that would imitate the scent of  blond tobacco, thus, placing a cigarette among the accoutrements of a chic Parisian woman.

Although I find nothing chic about smoking, Tabac Blond never fails to make me feel like someone effortlessly glamorous, outfitted in black satin, long gloves and pearls, with lips varnished crimson red. The elegance of this perfume is suggested by the unique combination of leather, tobacco leaf and vanilla. It is a dry fragrance, with a strong smoky note that initially reminds me of smoldering pine cones. This impression is pleasant one, and as the notes meld into unique dry leather composition, the warmth of amber fills the outlines of the composition. A smoky vanilla note makes its entrance relatively soon and adds a welcome touch of sweetness. A fragrance that is not traditionally feminine, Tabac Blond is a great choice for someone who is confident and daring (or at least wants to appear this way.)

From Yesterday's Perfumes

For anyone who's ever enjoyed the deliciously naughty pleasure of smoking (I know, I know, it's bad for you), you'll know that one of its unfortunate side effects is waking up to a pile of clothes that smell like a combination of perfume and cigarettes. And yet...

That olfactory trace of a vice-filled night out can bring great pleasure by evoking memories of living for the moment, of drawing in the heat and toasted flavor of tobacco deep into your lungs, of smoky kisses between peaty sips of scotch, and of coming back home too late to bother with removing your makeup.

Perhaps more than any other infamous tobacco classic (Habanita, Cuir de Russie, Jolie Madame or Scandal — but not Bandit, sorry), Tabac Blond lives up to these smoke-filled images of livin' la vida loca, only, instead of evoking stale cigarette smoke, at its heart is the rich, toasted caramel smell of rolling tobacco.

Composed by the wonderful Ernest Daltroff, who, as the nose for Narcisse Noir, seems to have specialized in creating perfumes for minxes-gone-wild, Tabac Blond paid homage to the scandalous bad girls who smoked cigarettes in the teens and '20s.

Unlike Cuir de Russie and Scandal, scents whose overly-cloying floral notes reveal that they don't have the courage of their tobacco convictions, Tabac Blond's tobacco and leather notes aren't upstaged by florals. It starts off with ylang-ylang and leather, and moves into a wonderful powdery yet sharp (some have said metallic, Caron website says "coppery") smoke note that continues to sing through to the vanillic, clove-y, spicy and warm dry down. (I detect some civet dirtiness; most lists of notes I see exclude it, but Olfactarama includes it.)

From Perfume Shrine

Tabac Blond (1919) was the opening salve of the garçonnes’ raid on gentlemen’s dressing tables. Its name evokes the “blonde” tobacco women had just started smoking in public. The fragrance was purportedly meant to blend with, and cover up, the still-shocking smell of cigarettes: smoking was still thought to be a sign of loose morals.
 
Despite its name, Tabac Blond is predominantly a leather scent, the first of its family to be composed for women and as such, a small but significant revolution. Though perfumery had recently started to stray from the floral bouquets thought to be the only fragrances suitable for ladies (Coty Chypre was launched in 1917), it had never ventured so far into the non-floral. Granted, there are floral notes, but apart from ylang-ylang, the clove-y piquancy of carnation and the cool powdery metallic note of iris, it doesn't stray much from masculine territory. Amber and musk smooth down the bitter smokiness of the leather/tobacco leaf duet, providing the opulent “roundness” characteristic of classic Carons. And it is this ambery-powdery base – redolent of powdered faces and lipstick traces on perfumed cigarettes – that pulls the gender-crossing Tabac Blond back into feminine territory to the contemporary nose.
 
From Vintage Perfume Vault
 
Tabac Blond is classified as a floral leather. For some it mimics to perfection the illusion of the scent of pale yellow-gold, cured tobacco leaves drying out in smoking barns and of the toppings used to flavor it. I am one of those people.
 
Tabac Blond is in all simplicity a leather perfume for women. But in reality it is much more than that. For starters, its timing was flawless- it came at the exact moment in history when women were breaking free; long held conventions were falling away. After having won on the right to vote, women began to demand to live independently and in their own way, without automatically being branded as wanton and immoral. Short cropped hair, dropped bustles and corsets and the new fad of women boldly smoking in public were only the outer manifestations of the inner freedom many women felt.
 
There are quite a few notes in common between Tabac Blond and the actual flavorings added to cigarettes. The perfume seems almost an enhancement of the traditional cigarette sauces. No wonder it goes down so well. At first, the sillage is surprisingly gentle. The perfume smells powdery and sweet - similar to a tobacco flower oil but not as thick or smotheringly sweet. The leather scent is a favorite kind of mine, smoky tart/fat and raw... I call it 'cowboy style' leather - like the thick soft yellow tanned leather of 'Make a Wallet' kits, and those great 1970's tooled leather purses. 
 
But I love this type of leather so much that whatever of it there is in Tabac Blond is supple and light for my preferences. The tobacco is cured, not smoked and so maybe it comes across a little heady, like the buzz after you take your first puff off of a cigarette. The carnation, patchouli, musk and lime play games with my mind - now I smell gum. The patchouli/amber/musk swirl around and around like so many vapor trails.
 
Tabac Blond really was a perfume way ahead of its time, too beautiful to serve as a functional perfume reserved merely for smokers, it was obviously conceived in love and meant to be worn and cherished, forever...
 
 
We are decanting from a bottle from the 1930s that was still sealed.
 

VINTAGE Caron Tabac Blond Extrait (Pure Parfum)

Parfums Caron was established by Ernest Daltroff in 1904. He purchased the perfumery from Anne-Marie Caron and kept the original name. At the same time, he met Félicie Wanpouille, who became his partner and an important contributor to the success of the house. While Daltroff created the fragrances, she designed bottles and served as the artistic director.

Daltroff created Tabac Blond in 1919 as a fragrance for women who smoked cigarettes. Many French women picked up American women's acceptance of smoking in public after World War I. It is a dry fragrance with a unique combination of leather, tobacco leaves and vanilla that has an intense note of smoke that is beloved by both men and women. 

The Caron website describes Tabac Blond as a great emotional perfume - coppery overtones combined with a floral heart note and just a touch of masculine nonchalance. It features top notes of leather, carnation and linden (lime blossom); middle notes of iris, ylang-ylang, vetiver and lime tree leaf; and base notes of cedar, patchouli, vanilla, amber and musk.

From Now Smell This
 
A lot has been made of Luca Turin's statement, as quoted by Chandler Burr in The Emperor of Scent, that Caron Tabac Blond is "dykey and angular and dark and totally unpresentable", and that a man who takes a woman wearing Tabac Blond to meet his mother is set for trouble. For sure, if the mother is looking for a gently floral daughter-in-law with a cashmere sweater set and a subscription to Good Housekeeping, she will be disappointed. But Turin's larger discussion is often overlooked, that Tabac Blond embodies the wit and intelligence of chic. Turin ends his rant about the sorry state of chic these days by saying that a savvy mother will admire the style of her son's Tabac Blond-wearing lover.
 
The first time I smelled Tabac Blond was on a cotton ball, and it seemed harsh and almost diesel-like to me. Once I had it on my skin, though, I knew I’d always have a bottle on hand. Although I can imagine a man wearing Tabac Blond well, on me the perfume feels luxuriously womanly.

Tabac Blond's range isn’t huge. I don't get the piquant top notes that many fragrances provide, but instead tobacco leaf, gently supported by spicy florals, starts right off the bat. Then the scent of raw leather appears for a while, and the effect is that of a buttery leather ashtray full of cigarette butts and snickerdoodles, or maybe a leather-vanilla soufflé in a smoky brasserie, if anything like that were ever cooked up. Imagine lipstick-stained wine glasses on marble-topped tables, a smeared golden haze on the mirror over the bar, and worn, red leather banquettes, and you start to get the idea. Tabac Blond has good staying power, and a dab on each wrist and behind the ears will last all day.

Lauren Stover's The Bombshell Manual of Style says "if you must travel light and Tabac Blond suits you, this is the perfume to grab", and I couldn’t agree more. 

From Fragrantica - Guest

This review is for the vintage parfum extrait. One drop on one wrist is all it takes for me to get wafts of this for the whole day and on into evening. Tabac Blond really is very edgy. When I sniff my wrist or even just smell the outside of my vintage bottle, in my minds eye I see the drag racing scene in 'Rebel Without a Cause.' Loose tobacco, smoke, and burning rubber: all of these smells comprise Tabac Blond. Many people say they cannot smell any tobacco in Tabac Blond and it's true that TB does not smell like cigarettes, or cigars, or pipe tobacco....but I think it does resemble the smell of loose chewing tobacco. And after many hours, when only the dregs are left, the Tabac Blond base-notes of amber and a hint of vanilla are laid bare. I can smell no leather per se in this, but I do smell what I imagine a leather clad, bad-ass biker might smell like after a long night of brawling and womanizing at the biker bar.

From Fragrantica - rebella

I have the tiniest little sample of Caron Tabac Blond extrait. I was a little worried at first that I wouldn't like it since I don't like all vintage fragrances. But I didn't have to worry. Tabac Blond is, on me, an archetypical kind of perfume. It smells like perfume's history, presence and future at the same time. It is elegant, ageless and timeless. 

The carnation note is close to being a carnation soliflore but somehow it manages not to be. It is rich, golden, strong and very pleasant without being too much. The leather note is quite discrete on me, just as I like leather in perfume. In Tabac Blond the leather note is pure with refined luxury yet still has some rough edges.

Caron's Tabac Blond deserve its place among perfume legends. It's long-lasting, rich and makes me feel like a golden-age Hollywood movie star. Tabac Blond could easily be worn by both men and women and I think it would suit any age, apart from maybe the youngest. I'll always need a little amount of Tabac Blond in my collection, it is like a golden shining star. Masterpiece class, best of the best, a must must must try!

From Bois de Jasmin

Ernest Daltroff must have been quite a character and also a man of great marketing vision. When smoking became appropriate for women after WWI, in 1919, he promptly created Tabac Blond. It was a fragrance that would imitate the scent of  blond tobacco, thus, placing a cigarette among the accoutrements of a chic Parisian woman.

Although I find nothing chic about smoking, Tabac Blond never fails to make me feel like someone effortlessly glamorous, outfitted in black satin, long gloves and pearls, with lips varnished crimson red. The elegance of this perfume is suggested by the unique combination of leather, tobacco leaf and vanilla. It is a dry fragrance, with a strong smoky note that initially reminds me of smoldering pine cones. This impression is pleasant one, and as the notes meld into unique dry leather composition, the warmth of amber fills the outlines of the composition. A smoky vanilla note makes its entrance relatively soon and adds a welcome touch of sweetness. A fragrance that is not traditionally feminine, Tabac Blond is a great choice for someone who is confident and daring (or at least wants to appear this way.)

From Yesterday's Perfumes

For anyone who's ever enjoyed the deliciously naughty pleasure of smoking (I know, I know, it's bad for you), you'll know that one of its unfortunate side effects is waking up to a pile of clothes that smell like a combination of perfume and cigarettes. And yet...

That olfactory trace of a vice-filled night out can bring great pleasure by evoking memories of living for the moment, of drawing in the heat and toasted flavor of tobacco deep into your lungs, of smoky kisses between peaty sips of scotch, and of coming back home too late to bother with removing your makeup.

Perhaps more than any other infamous tobacco classic (Habanita, Cuir de Russie, Jolie Madame or Scandal — but not Bandit, sorry), Tabac Blond lives up to these smoke-filled images of livin' la vida loca, only, instead of evoking stale cigarette smoke, at its heart is the rich, toasted caramel smell of rolling tobacco.

Composed by the wonderful Ernest Daltroff, who, as the nose for Narcisse Noir, seems to have specialized in creating perfumes for minxes-gone-wild, Tabac Blond paid homage to the scandalous bad girls who smoked cigarettes in the teens and '20s.

Unlike Cuir de Russie and Scandal, scents whose overly-cloying floral notes reveal that they don't have the courage of their tobacco convictions, Tabac Blond's tobacco and leather notes aren't upstaged by florals. It starts off with ylang-ylang and leather, and moves into a wonderful powdery yet sharp (some have said metallic, Caron website says "coppery") smoke note that continues to sing through to the vanillic, clove-y, spicy and warm dry down. (I detect some civet dirtiness; most lists of notes I see exclude it, but Olfactarama includes it.)

From Perfume Shrine

Tabac Blond (1919) was the opening salve of the garçonnes’ raid on gentlemen’s dressing tables. Its name evokes the “blonde” tobacco women had just started smoking in public. The fragrance was purportedly meant to blend with, and cover up, the still-shocking smell of cigarettes: smoking was still thought to be a sign of loose morals.
 
Despite its name, Tabac Blond is predominantly a leather scent, the first of its family to be composed for women and as such, a small but significant revolution. Though perfumery had recently started to stray from the floral bouquets thought to be the only fragrances suitable for ladies (Coty Chypre was launched in 1917), it had never ventured so far into the non-floral. Granted, there are floral notes, but apart from ylang-ylang, the clove-y piquancy of carnation and the cool powdery metallic note of iris, it doesn't stray much from masculine territory. Amber and musk smooth down the bitter smokiness of the leather/tobacco leaf duet, providing the opulent “roundness” characteristic of classic Carons. And it is this ambery-powdery base – redolent of powdered faces and lipstick traces on perfumed cigarettes – that pulls the gender-crossing Tabac Blond back into feminine territory to the contemporary nose.
 
From Vintage Perfume Vault
 
Tabac Blond is classified as a floral leather. For some it mimics to perfection the illusion of the scent of pale yellow-gold, cured tobacco leaves drying out in smoking barns and of the toppings used to flavor it. I am one of those people.
 
Tabac Blond is in all simplicity a leather perfume for women. But in reality it is much more than that. For starters, its timing was flawless- it came at the exact moment in history when women were breaking free; long held conventions were falling away. After having won on the right to vote, women began to demand to live independently and in their own way, without automatically being branded as wanton and immoral. Short cropped hair, dropped bustles and corsets and the new fad of women boldly smoking in public were only the outer manifestations of the inner freedom many women felt.
 
There are quite a few notes in common between Tabac Blond and the actual flavorings added to cigarettes. The perfume seems almost an enhancement of the traditional cigarette sauces. No wonder it goes down so well. At first, the sillage is surprisingly gentle. The perfume smells powdery and sweet - similar to a tobacco flower oil but not as thick or smotheringly sweet. The leather scent is a favorite kind of mine, smoky tart/fat and raw... I call it 'cowboy style' leather - like the thick soft yellow tanned leather of 'Make a Wallet' kits, and those great 1970's tooled leather purses. 
 
But I love this type of leather so much that whatever of it there is in Tabac Blond is supple and light for my preferences. The tobacco is cured, not smoked and so maybe it comes across a little heady, like the buzz after you take your first puff off of a cigarette. The carnation, patchouli, musk and lime play games with my mind - now I smell gum. The patchouli/amber/musk swirl around and around like so many vapor trails.
 
Tabac Blond really was a perfume way ahead of its time, too beautiful to serve as a functional perfume reserved merely for smokers, it was obviously conceived in love and meant to be worn and cherished, forever...
 
 
We are decanting from a bottle from the 1930s that was still sealed.
 
$14.99

Warranty Information

All sales are final, we are a perfume sampling company - letting you try perfume before you invest in a bottle. Unfortunately, we cannot refund any product that you do not like. If you are new to perfume or wanting to break out of wearing the same scent, try our starter sampler packs so that you can find the perfume that works for you.

Write your own product review

Product Reviews

This product hasn't received any reviews yet. Be the first to review this product!